your manual

 

Adding images to a gallery:

Click gallery, add gallery/images:

in this dialog you can choose files from your hard drive and choose the gallery to upload it to.

On the manage gallery page you will see the ID of each gallery. This is important, because galleries are being inserted into the page or post by a short code. Please get the short code for the slideshow of the type used in your website by copying from the other pages or posts and see how it is done there. Please do not format this code in bold or italics, it can cause errors.

I usually crop the or resize the images before uploading, to save space and upload time. The gallery software itself is set to automatically rescale them to maximum 800 pixels wide and high.

 

Creating a quote:

WordPress has an easy way of creating so-called block quotes:

you select the text you want to have shown as a block quote [we use it to display quotes above the slideshows]

just select the paragraph you want to have shown as a block quote, and click the quotation icon. You will see the text being indented in edit mode. The special formatting with red line around and grayish background will automatically appear on the webpage.

 

Portfolio pages

Portfolio pages are specially programmed to display the headline and featured image of the posts of a certain category. Example: “portfolio” shows all four posts of the category portfolio. Since this technology could only be used once in our system, we had to create sub – portfolio posts, such as “private residential”, “public buildings”, “in progress” etc.

The sequence is showing the latest first. Change the sequence by changing the date.

These posts of the only ones, where you might have to switch to HTML mode [when you edit a post or page, you will always see two tabs on the right side of the icons: visual at HML]. I have prepared a sample, where you just have to copy and paste the code for one line of projects [for example Aerie I and Beyond the Beyond]. After that you can switch to visual mode, change the headlines, link them to the right post, exchange picture, link it to the same post.

 

Blog pages

Whenever you write a blog-post, just assign it to the category architectural-musings and select under Post Template “Testimonial Blog”.

 

Sidebar images

In order to insert an image to the sidebar widget, you nee the url (=link) where the image is located.

In order to do that, go to Media – add new, upload it to your library. In the edit dialogue, you will find the File URL.

Copy and paste it into the sidebar widget (Appearance > Widgets > Primary Sidebar).

You will notice that all widgets have at their bottom a field “Widget logic “. It relates to limitations that can be defined, like where to show it: is_page( ’294′ ) means that this widget only shows on page or post 294. How to know that number? Just look into the list of posts and pages – the id is close to the right side.

 

Testimonials

To add a testimonial, click Posts > new, write the headline (which becomes the headline of the post), insert the text and image (probably right aligned), on the right sidebar checkmark the Testimonials Category, a bit lower the Post Template Testimonial Blog.

The sequence is showing the latest first. Change the sequence by changing the date.

Inner Courtyard

  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • courtyard-01
  • courtyard-02
  • courtyard-03
  • courtyard-04
  • courtyard-05
  • courtyard-06
  • courtyard-07
  • courtyard-08
  • courtyard-09
  • courtyard-10
  • courtyard-11
  • courtyard-12
  • courtyard-13

Instead of a gated subdivision, this home is in the center of West Sedona.  The street facade is like a fortress so when the inner courtyard is revealed it comes as a surprise to most visitors.  Creating two buildings out of the program transforms a lot that is not that big into a seemingly very large lot.

Although surrounded by neighbors, the design and the landscaping screen them out so, from within the house and outdoor terraces one feels complete privacy.  The south side has a porch roof that hovers without visible supports in order to frame the sweeping view.  One can look back through the entire great room to the views to the north, where the central courtyard is becoming a lush landscape, a place where one is sheltered from winds and is a sun trap in winter.

Panorama

  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • pano-01
  • pano-02
  • pano-03
  • pano-04
  • pano-05
  • pano-06
  • pano-07
  • pano-08
  • pano-09
  • pano-10
  • pano-11
  • pano-12
  • pano-13

The name says it all:  the clients wanted to maximize their panoramic outlook and the design did just that.

 

Professional photographs by Natalie Stetz.

Meditation Center

  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • meditation-center-01_0
  • meditation-center-02
  • meditation-center03
  • meditation-center-04
  • meditation-center-05
  • meditation-center-06
  • meditation-center07
  • meditation-center-08
  • meditation-center-09
  • meditation-center-10
  • meditation-center-11
  • meditation-center12
  • meditation-center-13
  • meditation-center-15
A meditation center was created on the grounds of an old church and we had to remodel existing, non-descript buildings on a somewhat dry and barren lot.  The budget forced us to keep new buildings in simple forms that worked with the old ones and therefore what unified the complex was the palette of materials and grammar of construction, especially with arcades that connected the parts together as a whole.
More than any other project, what would make this one successful would be the landscaping and luckily there were master gardeners within the meditation community that took the concept and ran with it, transforming the property completely as they created a little Eden in what was once a very un-welcoming site.  Now neighbors look on a lush and private landscape where most of the buildings are hidden from view.
The most important quality an architect can have from a client is trust:  this is an example of how it works both ways.  The color scheme was the client’s concept, and having faith in them proved right for creating a serene environment without going the usual terracotta or green “Sedona” route.

Slopes of Haleakala

  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • olinda-pad-2-2010-010 m1
  • olinda-site-6-18-08-010 m2
  • olinda-layout-2-2010-045 m3
  • olinda-layout-2-2010-039 m4
  • radiant-floor-2 m5
  • radiant-floor-4 m6
  • maui-framing-2 m m7
  • maui8

A site in Maui poised between heaven and earth, on idyllic, sloping pastureland with ocean views on each side of the island.  An extended design process that was always for the better, with clients refining and refining the plan towards a smaller, simpler concept.  They have been at it for many years, long before they hired me, and are very aware of how precious this land is and the importance of doing the right design.

Enchantment II

  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • al-landscaped-rendering-e1
  • al-const-12-2011-005-e2
  • al-const-12-2011-008-e3
  • al-const-10-2011-010-e4
  • al-const-11-2011-022-e5
  • al-main-chimney-2-2012-e6
  • al-study-2-2012-e7

Spectacular cliff views, including a high alcove with ruins, set the stage for this project.  Discerning and enthusiastic clients, a great client-builder relationship, and the fantastic setting have made this project an absolute pleasure to build.

Beyond the Beyond

  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • b1
  • b2
  • b3
  • b5
  • b4
  • b6
A quintessential Sedona site:  high on a cliff with the sound and views of Oak Creek running below and the iconic Cathedral Rock in the distance beyond.  Regular sightings of deer, coyote, and bobcat, along with the constant presence of the big birds:  ravens, hawks, herons, and the occasional bald eagle.  A place of wonder.
The architect is building this himself, with his own hands, an “off-grid” house for his family.

Aerie I

  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • simmer-sunset-courthouse-cathedral-6-10-08-002
  • simmer-garage-from-street
  • simmer-wout-trees
  • simmer-distant

Views in every direction, including distant horizon views with red rock monuments below, an unusual vantage point for Sedona.  A high “aerie” room was requested to enjoy this panorama.  Another long process— which often results in better designs— where the clients held off for a spell to move to and live in Sedona.  Their experience in doing that has led to refinements in the design and we are ready to break ground.

Mexican Sedona

  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • 001-mexican-sedona-1-2012
  • 002-mexican-sedona-2-2012
  • 003-mexican-sedona-11-2011
  • 004-mexican-sedona-2-2012
  • 005-mexican-sedona-11-2011
  • 006-mexican-sedona
  • 007-mexican-sedona
  • 008-mexican-sedona
  • 009-mexican-sedona
  • 010-mexican-sedona-2-2012
  • 011-mexican-sedona-2-2012
  • 012-mexican-sedona
  • 013-mexican-sedona

The clients were art collectors and very experienced in the world of design, including being familiar with the work of famed Mexican modernists such as Luis Barragan and Ricardo Legorreta. Although I don’t approach design in terms of “styles”, but rather respond to the situations of site and client requirements, I refer to this as “Mexican” because it was the first project where I was allowed to fully use all the materials, detailing, and design sensibilities of what I had grown up with and what, in a way, comes naturally to me.

Although the house has large expanses of glass, the focus was nonetheless on the shelter and embrace of large walled areas in rustic finishes that contrast with refined, modern detailing. And although it has Mexican roots, the house is very much of Sedona, especially in relation to it’s thickly wooded site where the house rambles and dances around trees, including the creation of surprising internal courtyards that preserve many of these.

 

Two images by Michael Mathers

Tlaquepaque Art Village

“…the principle of the second man: it is the second man who determines whether the creation of the first man will be carried forward or destroyed”
Edmund Bacon, “The Design of Cities”

 

  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • NextGen scrollGallery2 thumbnail
  • patio-del-norte-web-4-19-07-049
  • tlaqepaque-11-2011-063 t2
  • patio-del-norte-4-19-07-044 t1
  • patio-del-norte-4-19-07-028 t5or6
  • tlaqepaque-11-2011-009 t4
  • OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
  • patio-del-norte-4-19-07-016 t7
  • patio-del-norte-above-web t3
  • tlaqepaque-11-2011-051
  • tlaqepaque-11-2011-079 t9
  • tlaqepaque-11-2011-008

Tlaquepaque is probably the most loved architectural complex in Sedona. Created by Abe Miller, a retired developer, on land by Oak Creek, he traveled to Mexico several times to collect antiques for the project and then he and his architect and builder created numerous fountain courtyards woven around the magnificent sycamores on the site, They built in vernacular fashion, without levels or plumbs, and created a magical environment that is the best urban design in Sedona, a place where people can experience the pedestrian lifestyle that all old towns use to revolve around.

Thus, the first rule of design in such a situation is to defer to the existing buildings. Various antiques and a large mural were saved from the demolition of a patio screen wall and relocated in various locations on the new building. We had to work hard to make these buildings appear aged naturally over time as the existing ones had, but we knew we were successful when, newly opened, some visitors did not believe they were new buildings and additions to the complex. We don’t do traditional design like this for new buildings elsewhere, but we were more than happy to do so for this project, and were grateful to be able to add to and preserve Tlaquepaque’s unique magic.

Visit Tlaquepaque at www.tlaq.com

 

Charles Van Block   Architects, Inc.  -  2675 W Hwy 89a #1239  -  Sedona AZ 86336  - Tel: 928-607-6446 -  Email

Created by Sedona Website Design